Archive for the ‘Mom Has the Advantage with the Young Ones’ Category

Mom Has the Advantage with the Young Ones

Monday, October 21st, 2019

Laws in Mississippi have certainly changed since the passage of Albright v. Albright (it is on our home page), but the reality is that mom almost always has a slight advantage when it comes to obtaining primary physical custody of a young child.  We have often looked at the doctrine that was front and center in custody cases prior to the Albright case, which was referred to as the “tender years” policy.  Although it has been deviated from, based upon the preference for Albright analysis, many of the same approaches are still employed when litigating a custody case.  After seeing this play out first hand–hundreds of times, mom usually does carry a slight advantage…unless she screws it up by cheating, drug use, alcohol abuse and, well you get the point.

The “tender age doctrine” has been undergoing a re-evaluation in the past decades, and rightfully so.  Times have changed in many ways, but so much remains the same.  Two states have essentially upended the notion that mom is better with having custody of a young child, and their courts have held that the maternal presumption favoring mothers in custody cases violates state as well as United States Constitutional guarantees of the Fourteenth Amendment. 

Some of the challenges to the tender years (or tender-aged) statutes have also been based in the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution.  See Watts v. Watts, 77 Misc.2d 178, 350 N.Y.S.2d 285 (1973). The tender years presumption has also at times been held unconstitutional as a gender-based classification which discriminates between fathers and mothers in child custody cases solely on basis of their sex. Devine v. Devine, 398 So.2d 686 ( Ala. 1981).  However, state statutes generally control unless appealed to a federal court.  Few can afford to do so.

So, where does Mississippi stand?  Is there truth that dad doesn’t have a chance?  Not necessarily, but he usually has a taller hill to climb to obtain custody of a young child than mom does, and that’s not written law, it is likely cultural more than anything else.  The Albright analysis does afford some advantage to mom, particularly because of the continuity of care when dad is at work. 

I fully appreciate that dad often gets punished in this sense for earning and supporting his family.  If mom is also at work and their child is being equally cared for by both parents, this advantage can easily disappear.  However, due to the commonality of mom staying home, receiving some maternity leave, continuity of care usually will favor her.  Some states do require employers to mandate paternity leave, but not Mississippi.  See our other articles wherein we discuss the power and importance of being the primary caregiver, because they are particularly front and center in this conversation.  It truly is the most likely predictor of who wins custody.

In sum, dad has a relatively equal shot at obtaining custody but for the fact that they are likely not an equal caregiver…especially if mom stays home.  If the father of a child truly wants to increase the possibility of obtaining child custody, he needs to find a way to, at the very least, be an equal participant in child-rearing.  Even though it is difficult to afford for many, hiring help is usually his best shot so that mom can return to work.  That way, at least he can argue that mom who does not stay at home is not advantaged by his daily absence.  Make no mistake, I understand full-well how unfair this may seem to all of the dads out there.

If you have a child custody issue and are seeking primary custody, give us a call and we can give you unfiltered advice in obtaining the best result for your kids.  As a single dad, I appreciate your devotion to your children, but more importantly, so do they.